Welcome To Bear Hunting Info

Dating right the way back to prehistoric times, the bear has been hunted by man in those times specifically for their meat and fur. This is still relevant today, but now there is the added excitement of tracking one of natures most spectacular of beasts. Indeed it is said that bear hunting generates an adrenalin rush like no other and is an experience of a lifetime, taking into account the tracking, stalking and eventual killing of the prey. This is however a heavily regulated pastime and, as a consequence, requires the correct licences and permits for the specific regions, and the penalties can be quite severe for anybody failing to comply.
Of the 8 types of bear species living in various locations around the planet, there are probably 4 of which are extensively hunted. The North American black bear can grow to around 6 feet in height and run at speeds of up to 25 miles per hour. Black bear hunting is usually most popular in the springtime, when their much sought after coats are at their thickest. There will usually be quite a density of numbers of this species found near agricultural lands, in heavily timbered forests, or close by to wheat based crops, such as oats.

The brown bear is up to 2 feet taller and 200 pounds heavier in weight than its black cousin, and therefore significantly more dangerous. These are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, with the most widespread being in Europe and Asia. Brown bear hunting is popular in Russia and the Scandinavian countries as well, however, although it is also popular amongst those inhabiting areas of Alaska, British Columbia, the Yukon and Alberta, these are actually referred to as Grizzlies.

The grizzly bear is a very large predator with a distinctive hump on its shoulders and has long claws, longer than the average human finger. Due to their excellent sense of smell, which is actually better than that of a hound dog, grizzly bear hunting can be more challenging. These bears will eat both vegetation and other animals, including moose, elk and caribou, but their most common diet is the salmon. They present a real danger to any careless hunter.

Polar Bear The largest of all the bear family is the polar bear, growing up to 11 feet in height and known to weigh as much as 1000 pounds. These are native to the Arctic Circle and have a diet consisting mainly of seals and fish. The Inuit population continue to practice polar bear hunting as part of their culture, dating back thousands of years. However, these have been joined by many so called trophy hunters, who track and kill the bears, to be stuffed and mounted for display.

Hunting any animal can be thrilling, but with the size of the bear in mind, no matter what species, bear hunting is highly dangerous, so it is important to make sure certain guidelines are followed to ensure safety is of the essence. Never even think about hunting if under the influence of alcohol, and always wear the acknowledged hunter colour of orange, in the form of a vest and hat. If possible do not hunt alone, but if necessary, always ensure somebody else is aware of the location you are heading. Make sure you keep your finger off the trigger until completely ready to shoot, and ensure the animal is definitely dead before attempting to move it. Following a few common sense rules will allow you to stay safe, whilst maximizing the exhilaration of hunting one of the planets great beasts.